Safety Measures for Credit Cards

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 May 2015 12:54 Written by Albert Greenhut Thursday, 30 October 2014 04:46

America leads the way in losses due to credit card fraud, accounting for 47% of the $11.3 Billion in worldwide fraud in 2012, the total amount is up 15% from 2011. American consumers are targeted because there are more credit cards here and magnetic strip security systems are easy to bypass. This is why many companies are rolling out new security measures, for instance Target is spending $100 Million to be ready for the new chip and pin cards.

The norm for American credit card protection is defensive, in essence verifying after the transaction that there was no fraud. Other countries have dramatically lowered their losses due to credit card skimming (data theft) by preventing the fraudulent purchases from taking place by using the chip and pin system. For example Canada, using the chip and pin system, lowered losses from M$142 to M$38 (a 70% decrease).

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Different Scales

Last Updated on Thursday, 17 September 2015 03:11 Written by Albert Greenhut Friday, 3 October 2014 02:40

Different Scales

Sometimes making sense of things that are on different scales of magnitude than we are can be difficult. I use scale in the broadest of terms here. Sometimes it is hard to wrap our minds around the really big things like the scale of the universe or on the small end of the spectrum like atoms or quarks. Other scales include things that are moving quickly or slowly. Really anything that is outside of our ability, mainly our senses, to experience can be hard to grasp. Technology has helped us grasp and understand some of these things. My favorite visualization of scale is from the video, see below, from the 70s when we were beginning to climb up the steep curve of technology, in that case it was microscopes and telescopes. Time lapse or high-speed cameras have more recently helped us envision things that were previously undetectable to our eyes. Things like the growth rate of lichen or how a curveball spins can now actually be seen in motion.

One interesting application of this is mapping out the wing patterns of different types of winged creatures found here. The scientist watched slowed down versions of revolutions of different creatures’ wings to show how they work. I thought that the most interesting ones were the goose and the dragonfly. The goose uses its elbow joint on the upswing to rotate it wing and the dragonfly’s two sets of wings move differently. Humans have started being able to visualize these things to visualize how they work.

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